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Acting in the Age of Covid

How An Actor Can Still Practice Their Craft

I get it. I am just as you are with this pandemic. Like you, my life as an actor has been dormant for almost two years and the job if an actor has gotten more and more challenging. But, all is not lost. I am here to tell you that there are plenty of things you can do as an actor to improve your craft and continue growing as an artist. It was apparent to me in the beginning of the shut down. In some ways, I welcomed the break from chasing down acting opportunities through online submissions. I could do with the traffic going to and from the set, theatre, or casting meetings. Be careful what you wish for. After about a week, I was ready to grab my mask and head over to each of the major studies in town and demand to read for any part. Then came Zoom. An opportunity to still participate in the pursuit of acting jobs was just an iPhone, iPad,  or MacBook away.

Online casting wasn’t invented during the pandemic. Prior to the pandemic, most every audition I attended was either recorded or stream to directors and producers on location. The difference with using the internet for casting as the only way to cast actors, would become the norm. What about acting classes, performances, and films. Zoom was the home of comedy improv, plays, and even online coaching sessions. My frustration grew, but so did my perseverance as an actor to envelope myself in my craft.

I figured that this pandemic and being an actor would be a formidable challenge to overcome. So, I decided to focus my energies in things I could control. I watched movies and television shows specifically to study and reverse engineer the brilliance of my favourite actor. Their commitment to character and the engagement the actors had with their scene partners and their own scripted arcs. I read plays and practiced monologues. I would use my iPhone to record myself performing monologues and then put my performance under the same scrutiny that I afforded Streep, DeNiro, Cumberbatch, and Coleman, to name a few. I also ventured into online I would also use FaceTime to connect with fellow actors and do scenes or chat about the craft. To be the passion alive I also felt that “being in class” was another avenue to explore. Online acting classes or coaching sessions were available and still are. I was, at first, a bit sceptical. I taught classes in person with a room full of people performing in front of me. I brought in concepts and exercises that were dependant on an in person experience. But, what I have now found out is that these online acting experiences can be beneficial. As of this moment it is the only game in town, but the doesn’t mean we can’t benefit as actor by this experience. The other thing to consider is that whomever is watching you through their screens are watching you perform on camera from anywhere in the world. If you are contemplating a career in front of the camera, this is an opportunity to see how believable you come off on camera.

There are enough challenges in an actor’s life not to consider all aspects of acting and learning your craft. We cannot wait for the virus to dictate our passion for storytelling and inhabiting interesting and relatable characters. An Online experience isn’t a replacement for the in person experience, but it is the best we got at this moment. 

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Javier Ronceros has worked with numerous award winning actors, producers & directors over a 30 year career in Television, Film and theatre.  He co-starred with Mark Wahlberg in the 2019 film “Instant Family.”  He  has taught Acting at the SAG Conservatory Los Angeles, American Film Institute, privately for many years and is also a Director and Writer.

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1242146/

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